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The Women in Print Awards: Katherine Becher

(September 2016) posted on Thu Sep 01, 2016

The owner and creative director of Wicked Wraps has dedicated herself to flawless work and top-notch customer education.

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By Adrienne Palmer

Katherine Becher

Owner, Creative Director

Wicked Wraps

Mukilteo, Washington

Industry innovations: Focuses on customer education and relationships; debunks wrap myths, i.e., “bubbling on vehicles is normal”

Philanthropy: Regularly produces sponsored car wraps and free wraps for infant cranial helmets; founding member of Next Generation Mukilteo; Mukilteo Chamber of Commerce

Leadership roles: Set company standard that flawless work is mandatory; lead graphic designer for all Wicked Wraps projects

What are the current challenges facing women in print?

There are no more challenges in printing industries than a woman would find in any other industries; however, we do have a huge problem facing our industry and that is customer education. The biggest challenge that I encounter on a daily basis is working to educate customers that all wraps are not created equal. For so many customers, the question that seems to matter to them the most is “how much does it cost?” This is very troubling when talking about a major purchasing decision as there are many factors to consider besides cost. The important question(s) should be: What materials are being used? How long will it last? What happens if there are problems with the graphics over time? The list goes on and on.

Of course, “what does it cost?” is an important question, but it shouldn’t be the only question. It’s my job to educate customers about best practices in every aspect of the wrap industry, from designing wraps, to materials, printing equipment, and installation, as well as warranty and maintenance. I would rather help a customer get a high-quality, well-designed, and artfully installed partial wrap than see the same customer invest in a full wrap that features a bad design, is printed on inferior materials, and/or is installed poorly.

It is my hope that by educating as many people as I can about the ins and outs of the industry, the collective standards of all wrap providers will become elevated and that over time “crappy wraps” will cease to exist.

What would you say to a young woman who is interested in working in the printing industry?

In the printing industry and any other industry, my advice to a young woman would be the same: Invest in your education and then spend time finding out what you love. The ultimate challenge is to figure out a way to turn what you love into your career. And if/when you succeed in that, and/or during your journey, make sure to share your passion and help others along the way.

Meet the rest of our 2016 Women in Print Award winners.

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