Take It Slow

'Life moves pretty fast. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.'

Run Fast. Eat Slow. That’s the title of 2017 New York City Marathon Champion Shalane Flanagan’s cookbook. If I’m going to take health advice from someone, it might as well be from a four-time Olympian, right? 

The science behind eating slow shows that you’ll get full faster. When you eat quickly, the brain doesn’t realize how much it’s consumed, so it tells you you’re still hungry even if you’re not. 

“Slow down” is sage advice for all of us. Not just when we’re eating, but in most aspects of our lives. We have smartphones and fast cars. Social media and tight deadlines. Fast food and endless emails. 

As business leaders, we’re invariably busy, constantly putting out fires, and moving onto the next big project. But when we’re rushing at work, we aren’t taking the time to think properly. So the question becomes: What are we hurting with our Tasmanian-devil, get-it-done-now wake?

Take the time to slow down. 

Slow down and demonstrate personal consideration for your top performers, so they remain engaged and thriving at your shop. 

Slow down and institutionalize the skill and knowledge from your learned and savvy veterans, so your millennial (and soon, Gen Z) workforce can replicate their wisdom. 

Slow down and network with your peers at industry events. (You attended WFX, right?) 

Slow down and eat well, read, exercise, and connect with family and friends for your own self-care. 

The biggest benefit to eating slow? Greater satisfaction. 

So, slow down. Pick your head up. Ensure your company is on the right course. Your employees, your business, and your body will thank you.

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